Creating Dual Classrooms. A Positive or a Negative in Higher Education?

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(http://www.hotcoursesabroad.com/india/blog/seven-major-advantages-online-classes/)

In most classrooms, and especially in higher-education, the students of today rely on the flexibility of their work and social life balanced around a school schedule. What’s often seen when that delicate balance is even slightly thrown off is a decline in student performance. This could range from missing classes, not turning in assignments and even dropping classes as a whole (in certain cases). What if universities began to adopt the idea of a flexible course? Meaning that classes offer both online and the in class learning experiences. Obviously this sounds exactly like the traditional “hybrid” course, however the structure for a dual classroom differs in the sense that students are allowed to switch between being in the online course to being in class from week to week, depending on what best fits their schedule. In the scope of learning technologies, this initiative could perhaps accelerate the online learning curve at major universities throughout the U.S. On the other hand it would then require professors to prepare both an online and in class course to maintain this structure. Peirce College decided to try this structure out via a pilot test and what they found was that in the flexible course “absenteeism fell from 10.2 percent to 1.4 percent” (Fabris 1). The drop in absenteeism is major, especially for teachers who rely on participation as a focal point for grading. It also gives students the ability to form school around their life and rather than vice-versa, subsequently creating more focus on the class, regardless of whether the student is in class or learning online.

While the notion of dual classes is interesting and Peirce’s example does shed a positive light on ways to decrease absenteeism, it should be noted that Peirce College is a bit of an outlier. First they specifically cater to working adult students, who typically need the flexibility offered by Peirce. Second, the professors at Peirce already offered both versions of their course online and in class, so the transition into the dual classroom wasn’t as difficult as it would be for a professor who only taught online or in class versions. Overall the purpose of this study was to see if this allowed students more flexibility, while also proving beneficial to classroom focus, and while that was successful it is also imperative to think of how successful this would be at other campuses across the nation.

Source: http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/online-or-in-person-one-college-lets-students-switch-back-and-forth/56265