Optimizing Students’ dependency on College Wi-Fi

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In today’s day and age, WI-FI is as much of a necessity as dining halls, health centers or laundry services. A report from EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research found that 61 percent of college students connect at least two devices to the college network. With this kind of logic, colleges will have to ensure that students are able to access the environment needed to succeed. Streaming sites like Netflix will take up a lot of the university’s bandwidth, costing a sizable amount. Houston Community College, with 75,000 students across 26 campuses, reported that 65 percent of their wireless traffic was video based.

Besides just the bandwidth draining from YouTube, Hulu or Netflix, there are also cloud applications that can take up a lot of the network. Cloud apps that automatically sync files like Box and Google Drive will use up a lot of the network to even slow it down. File syncing applications are designed to continually operate in the background to keep the system running. Like file syncing apps, OS updates also run in the background with new software releases can use a large amount of bandwidth. Dropbox has a policy of taking up to 75 percent of bandwidth available when it’s updating, unless turned off.

Every year more students will bring in more devices which can only mean there needs to be an increase in access points as well to accommodate this. University of California, Irvine got even more proactive by installing 1,315 Cisco Systems in its residence halls. With the Cisco technologies, UNCW network administrators were able to determine the number of users on any access point to adjust to achieve the best coverage possible. There are also limits that are placed on some Wi-Fi based performances like using Netflix. They could set policies that block the or prioritize certain apps over others to ensure that testing doesn’t crash while people try to stream the next episode.

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